Want to learn more about Forensic Phonetics and Linguistics?

Each of the articles on this site (and more you can find here) includes masses of academic references and links to other materials.

As well, here are few useful links related to Forensic Transcription (in no particular order) that you might find interesting

International Association for Forensic Phonetics and Acoustics (IAFPA) http://www.iafpa.net/ International Journal of Speech Language and the Law 

https://journals.equinoxpub.com/index.php/IJSLL/index>>   Read the rest now

Contact

Forensic Transcription in Australia is created and run by Prof Helen Fraser. Please feel welcome to make contact using the form below.

+*0+*

An explosive murder confession – or a dodgy transcription?

17 March 2015

Listen to these two snippets of muttered self-talk, then read on to see how a transcript can prime journalists’ perception.

If you are among the few who have not already heard the media’s interpretation of this audio, you’ll find it useful if you write down what you hear now, before reading on – and if you have a moment, I would love to be told your perception – you can send a message here.>>   Read the rest now

Christopher Pyne: the c-word or the g-word?

16 May 2014

Social media claims Christopher Pyne dropped the ‘C’ word in parliament on Wednesday, but he says the word was ‘grub’. (SMH)

Huge interest the last day or two here in Oz as to whether Christopher Pyne, a right-wing politician, swore at a fellow politician in parliament.>>   Read the rest now

What did Oscar Pistorius really say?

10 April 2014

With so many responding to media invitations to form subjective opinions as to whether Oscar Pistorius’ emotion is genuine, are we missing factual errors in the reporting of what he is actually saying? Could scientific analysis help here?>>   Read the rest now

A new take on satanic messages

You’ve probably heard of the concerns voiced in the 1980s that rock bands could corrupt youth, by recording their songs so that if you played them backwards, the words would turn into a message from satan.>>   Read the rest now

George Zimmerman and Trayvon Martin: Judge orders voice testimony to be excluded

23 June 2013

The Zimmerman ruling

A ruling has been handed down on the voice evidence in the Zimmerman case we have been following. Judge Debra S Nelson gave high praise for Prof Peter French’s evidence (in her words, ‘The Court found the testimony of Dr. French to be the most compelling of the witnesses presented.‘). That is an important endorsement for the role of genuine expertise in relevant branches of phonetics in the legal system.>>   Read the rest now

George Zimmerman and Trayvon Martin: Can the voice evidence identify the speaker?

12 June 2013

An ongoing murder case in Florida, USA is discussing the vexed issue of whether it is possible to identify a speaker from a tiny, barely intelligible ‘grab’ of poor quality audio. One of the issues is the extent to which speaker comparison depends on prior decisions about what is being said (i.e. forensic transcription). The USA is very open about their court proceedings, so we are able to follow along with the debate. In this post you can hear the audio, and then (preferably in that order) read about case and listen to the expert testimony.>>   Read the rest now

The crisis call experiment

Watch the video here (if you haven’t already)

Hear the full audio here (warning: potentially distressing)

Quick summary here:

More detail here:

Current law allows police transcripts to assist juries in understanding the content of indistinct forensic audio – with a number of legal safeguards intended to mitigate any risk that an inaccurate transcript might mislead the jury. The problem is that the safeguards rely on lawyers and judges gaining a sense of personal confidence that they hear words suggested by the transcript. The present article describes a new experiment showing that personal confidence is a poor indicator of perceptual accuracy, since listeners can be easily and unwittingly “primed” to hear words suggested by an inaccurate transcript. This confirms previous research suggesting current safeguards are inadequate, adds new findings regarding the effect of an alternative suggestion, and supports the need for an evidence-based process ensuring all indistinct forensic audio used in court is accompanied by a reliable transcript. It also indicates there is an urgent need to change legal procedures for admission of transcripts of indistinct forensic audio used as evidence in criminal trials.>>   Read the rest now